Photo editing: The importance of post production.

March 27, 2013  •  Leave a Comment

 

“But that’s cheating”, I’ve heard many people say. My response to that is: nonsense. The vast majority of photos you see today have been processed. It’s post production. Good editing software is very important and handy in archiving what you saw in your minds eye when you took your photo. Every single photo I take goes through an editing process. Some more that others. But be careful when you do post production. It’s VERY easy to over process.

 

In a previous post I talk about me going back to London for interviews and then finally getting the call for a driving position during the peak ski season. Well, the peak season has passed and I did my work. But it was not as glamorous as the recruiting staff has led us to believe. Smoke and mirrors, as some of the returning staff called it.

 

One of the many reasons I was excited about this job, was the location. The Alps covered in snow is a seriously beautiful place, and I could not wait to take my camera for a walk. As it turned out, I was so busy there was no time to scout for good locations or wait for good light. All I could do was to concentrate on the composition, and later edit the photos to get my desired effect.

 

Below are a few examples of before and after photo processing:

Blog_Photo processing 01 In the image above there are not much difference between the two photos. In the "After" photo the exposure was increased and the white balance adjusted to make the snow look more white.

Arosa 04

In the final photo above, I've used a green monotone effect and cropped it more tight.

 

Blog_Photo processing 02 Again, the photos above only have slight differences. The exposure and contrast was increased and in the final photo below,

Arosa 03

I've used the same green monotone effect again.

 

Blog_Photo processing 04 There will be many times when your camera will be fooled by the light. Or, like me, you just didn't have your camera on the correct settings. The white clothing of the Bedouin has caused the camera to under expose his dark skin. With good photo editing software I've managed to get his face better exposed and even managed to get the white if his eyes better exposed.

 

Blog_Photo processing 05 The colours and tones of the two images above are almost identical. But notice the edge of each photo. Most lenses cause distortion where the vertical and horizontal lines are not exactly straight. Surprisingly, It's called lens distortion - easily corrected with good editing software.

 

Blog_Photo processing 06 In this last example, you can clearly see how the colours in the "After" photo has a lot more punch. Even the rocks in the bottom left corner are better exposed and has more colour. When you do start editing your photos to get more saturation and vibrance into the colours, be very careful not to over edit. It's very easy to get sucked into the pretty colours of your photo.


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